Wednesday, June 01, 2016

It’s Done!

What was started in 2011 is now done, it have been a long five years but the Massachusetts’ legislature finally passed the public accommodation part on the gender identity and expression non-discrimination law. It now goes back to the Seanate and then to the governor.
House passes Massachusetts transgender public accommodations bill
Boston.com
By Eric Levenson, Nik DeCosta-Klipa
June 1, 2016

Though opponents chanted “No” outside their doors earlier in the day, the Massachusetts House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly to pass a transgender public accommodations bill on Wednesday

The 116-36 vote was announced just before 6 p.m. to resounding applause inside the House chamber, following a long day of debate and attempts to amend the bill.

Like a similar bill passed by the state Senate earlier this month, the legislation would offer transgender people protections from discrimination at public accommodations like restaurants and malls, and allows people to use the restroom or locker room that matches their gender identity.

Unlike the Senate bill, the House bill also includes a provision that the Attorney General’s office issue guidance for potential legal action against “any person who asserts gender identity for an improper purpose.” The language refers to fears by some critics that say the so-called “bathroom bill” could be used as cover for predatory men who want to gain access to women’s bathrooms.

Senate President Stan Rosenberg has said he is open to the House formulation of the bill. Gov. Charlie Baker said on Tuesday that he would sign the House version of the bill if passed.

Senate President Stan Rosenberg has said he is open to the House formulation of the bill. Gov. Charlie Baker said on Tuesday that he would sign the House version of the bill if passed.
Now the bill goes back to the Senate to vote on the amended bill.

I don’t think that I will ever forget what I felt when I was sitting in the gallery when the Connecticut Senate passed the Connecticut our bill at 12:30 on a Saturday morning ending five years of working to pass the legislation. It was a mixture of feelings of jubilations and sadness because our work was done. I had made many friends while I went around the state talking about the bill at town hall meetings, it was so empowering and now it was over. The question that was on all our minds was “What’s next?”

I can only imaging those who worked on the Massachusetts bill are feeling right now. I imaging that there is a lot of partying going on right now.

They still have to have the Senate vote on the bill again and then the governor needs to sign but it is for all practical purpose as good as law.

Well done!

1 comment:

Rosa Lee Klaneski said...

I have a suggestion as to what's next. How about getting transgender women out of men's prisons and into women's ones. How's that going diana?