Monday, September 04, 2017

On This Labor Day This Is A Good Project

For many trans people they have a hard time getting a job and some of the reasons are common to non-trans people also, like how to apply for and how to interview a new job and this is true for those who were surviving by unconventional means.
Employment mentorship in the transgender community is more important than ever
The unemployment rate for transgender people is three times the national rate
The Lilly
By Alexandra E. Petri
September 1, 2017

In her work as director of the Los Angeles LGBT Center’s Transgender Economic Empowerment Project, Drian Juarez supports a range of clients: Gen Xers in their 40s who are moving away from sex work to office jobs; individuals transitioning at work; and young, gender nonconforming individuals who are eager to seek employment in a binary-working world.

Though each person’s story is unique, the underlying narrative that unifies them is the struggle to secure basic necessities, from housing to work. It’s a narrative that Juarez, a transgender woman who once engaged in sex work in order to support herself and cover her surgery costs, knows all too well — and it’s one that she is working hard to rewrite.
[…]
The Chicago-based Transworks Employment Program, run in conjunction with the Chicago House Employment Program, provides one-on-one career coaching, career development workshops, and mentoring to city’s transgender and gender nonconforming population, securing competitive employment for 96 percent of its clients in 2016.
This seems to be tailored to the individual to find their strong points,
On a microlevel, empowerment programs like TransWorks aid in goal setting, job searching, resume-writing, interview preparations, and job readiness skills like knowing your rights or resolving conflicts at work. On a macro-level, they work to educate the local community and businesses on policies and procedures to work respectfully with others.
The services that they provide are…
Like TransWorks in Chicago, San Francisco’s TEEI provides career coaching, trans inclusion training for human resource departments and policy review for employers, legal aid, job readiness workshops, networking through community events like job fairs, help for those transitioning on the job, and other services that are a conduit for economic empowerment and sufficiency for the trans community.
One of the problems that we have here in Connecticut is that we do not have the population base to support this type of service except in the cities like New Haven and Norwalk but even there they have to limit what they can do for the community.

I wish that we could have something like that here because it seems to be an excellent program.

No comments: