Friday, August 11, 2017

It’s Hard.

For many trans people it is hard to get over what she did, but Vogue has an article about Chelsea Manning  in their September edition.

The article has a lot about what she is wearing but it Vogue
Chelsea Manning Changed the Course of History. Now She’s Focusing on Herself
By Nathan Heller
August 10, 2017

One hot, humid early-summer evening in New York, a hired car slows on Bleecker Street, and a young woman inside prepares for her first party out in years. She is wearing a midnight-colored semiformal dress by Altuzarra and Everlane ankle boots with heels. Her hair is trimmed into a pixie cut; her makeup softens, but won’t hide, a dust of freckles. “I don’t know if I’ll know anybody,” she fretted earlier, but she seems to have quelled what nerves remain. She is accompanied by a couple of men who surround her like guards. For the first time in a long time, that’s a welcome thing.
The article goes on to talk about her life history and what lead up to her conviction on the espionage charges (22 of them including theft chages) and about President Obama commuting her sentence.
In his statement announcing the commutation, President Obama emphasized that it was not a pardon for her crime. “Let’s be clear: Chelsea Manning has served a tough prison sentence,” he said in a press conference. “I feel very comfortable that justice has been served.”

On the day of Manning’s release, things happened quickly. She picked her first outfit for life as a woman: a black-and-white striped blouse, with matching sneakers. She stopped at a roadside pizza joint, got a pepperoni slice, and posted a photo of it to Instagram. (“Freest pizza ever!” she tells me.) She had the lawyers who picked her up drive her to the countryside. “I think I spent, like, five or six hours sitting outside.”

A day after leaving Fort Leavenworth, she posted a new photo (“OK, so here I am everyone!!”) with the coder-inspired hashtag #HelloWorld. She had on a trim black dress by one of her favorite designers, Gabriela Hearst. Her hair was crisply coiffed; she wore a vibrant lip. In a Guardian column, written while in prison, Manning had discussed her nervousness about moving through the world as a woman. Now that she’s no longer worried about being “found out” by the military, she says, the fear is gone. “It feels natural. It feels like it’s how it’s supposed to be, instead of this anxiety, this uncertainty, this ball of self-consciousness that comes with pretending to be male,” she says. “It didn’t feel right. I didn’t know what it was. I couldn’t describe it. Now that’s gone.”
What will her future be?
She is also at work on a memoir. “I’m trying to tell the story as if it was happening now and you’re with me,” she explains. Hawkins, the documentarian, says he plans to stop shooting soon, as Manning’s personal narrative finds its own way in the world: “She’s too young for this film to attempt to be the definitive story of her life.”

Manning does not know what her career will be. While living as Bradley Manning, she expressed an interest in running for political office. I ask whether that’s still on her mind. “I’m certainly not going to say no, and I’m certainly not going to say yes,” she says. “My goal is to use these next six months to figure out where I want to go.
There are people who look upon her as a hero while other despise as a traitor however you look at her, she is going to have a very hard life ahead of her.

No comments: